is it seasonal?

Discussion in 'Open Topic (General)' started by jjm, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. Lucy4

    Lucy4 New Member

    mja...thank you for posting that study. There is clearly a lack of research on this phenomenon. I found another reference to this study which added one more sentence:

    "It seems likely that human hair follicles undergo cyclical activity and are influenced by environmental factors such as the photoperiod".

    It seems reasonable to assume that we humans would be as prone to shedding seasonally as other mammals. I think the variation in the length of daylight and temperature could certainly be factors, especially for those of us in the northern latitudes. Our circadium rhythm, controlled by the hypothalamus, is sensitive to the photoperiod. I have more than one autonomic-related disorder stemming from the hypothalamus, so I wouldn't be at all surprised if this comes into play with cyclical/seasonal shedding in my case.
  2. mja

    mja New Member

    Lucy4, thanks for finding that extra sentence. It's possible it was in the one I found on PubMed, but I may have left out the last sentence when I copied and pasted. I hadn't heard of the word photoperiod. One definition I just found says, "the period of time per day that an organism is exposed to daylight (or to artificial light)." So the length of the daylight period could even be a factor? Interesting!
  3. Lucy4

    Lucy4 New Member

  4. mja

    mja New Member

    Thanks for that link... some of the other ones sound interesting also.
  5. newbs

    newbs New Member

    This photoperiod I wonder if melatonin would help? I often wondered about it for seasonal hair loss. I also found a very long article relating to the seasonal hair loss plus other chronic Te shedding. It was done by one of the researches who was involved in the seasonal shedding study. His name is Burkhardt Seifert and if you google him with womans hair loss I think it will pop uo. Anyway, in this study they gave women something called pantagor and it gave good results. Google it, as it is very interesting.
    Lastly, imy hair loss is seasonal as I have already posted, but it started 2.5 years ago. I wonder why it did not happen before that? There must be something that triggers this heavy seasonal shedding. Probably different triggers for each of us?
  6. newbs

    newbs New Member

    oh my gosh. In the article I just read for FPHL estrogen is detrimental. Can this be? I thought estrogen was good for hair? I was just going to start estrogen as mine is very low. Has anyone heard that estrogen is bad for hair? I know if one is estrogen dominant it is bad. But what about otherwise?
  7. Lucy4

    Lucy4 New Member

    Pantogar appears to be just another hyped supplement product. I'm more than a little skeptical.
    http://www.pantogar.com/en/product_profile.php
  8. newbs

    newbs New Member

    melatonin and seasonal hair loss

    Does anyone know about melatonin for hair loss. it seems like it may be a possibility it would help seasonal hair loss. I know there are studies done on animals and they got hair growth using it. I here there is also a topical melatonin. I'm very much wondering if any of you ladies know anything about this? Thanks in advance
  9. mja

    mja New Member

    Estrogen

    I think that hormonal balance is a complicated and delicate thing to characterize when related to hair loss. I have been on estrogen therapy for a very long time. The only time I noticed it making my hair come out faster was when the dose was changed to a higher dose one time (the dose I was previously taking was not raising my estradiol levels high enough). Otherwise, I've seen very little relationship that was obvious to me. I also have not noticed it benefiting the hair, except perhaps to make it feel softer. But I've been on it so long (hysterectomy at a young age) that my situation would not apply to most other people's, and it's hard for me to really tell. Estrogen therapy is my "normal."
  10. newbs

    newbs New Member

    Lucy
    Do you have the burny itchy scalp when your shedding heavy? Also, have your fingernails been affected in any way. lastly, is your estrogen low? Do you know what your lab level is? Thanks. Kathy
  11. Lucy4

    Lucy4 New Member

    No itchy scalp which can be directly attributed to my yearly shedding. But I do get a type of dermatitis with itching on my scalp from time to time, which I can't pin down to any allergy, hair product or time of year. It does seem to occur when my hair is at its thickest though. My nails are chronically weak and brittle-probably from poor circulation in my fingertips. I've never had my estrogen levels tested, only my thyroid levels (within so-called "normal" range). I took HRT for six months during menopause to relieve some hot flash symptoms, but nothing since other than herbal alternatives like Estroven.
  12. newbs

    newbs New Member

    Hi Lucy
    Thank you for your quick reply. My nails have those thin ridge lines that startd maybe 6 months after my hair shedding started. I think it just took a little while for that to happen as it takes a few months for fingernails to grow full out. I know as far as thyroid is considered, ones tsh should not be over 3.0 and I have found ths most labs have not conformed to this newer figure and many/most still go by the old number of a high of 4.5 and some even as high as 5 which is very hypothyroid. Mine has bounced anywhere from 2008 at 1.8 to numbers mostly around 3.0 in 2009 but once was 4.5 and most rcent was 5.1. So maybe my thyroid has something to do with it, but I'm not too sure about that because when it was 1.8 in 2008, my hair loss was pretty active. And now as it is around 5.0 it is not shedding as heavy. Of course it is January and my shedding slows down the most at this time. So hmmmm. Also, I know my estrogen is low at the very bottom of the low for my age. about 5. So I'm thinking maybe it is more low estrogen? I wonder if your estrogen is low and might be contributing to your shedding. I emailed the researcher MD Ralph True, who did the study on womans seasonal hair loss. I asked him how it might relate to other alopecias. he basicaly told me, that seasonal shedding was normal, at any age, but having something like andrgenetic alopecia, or thyroid, or low estrogen alopecia, could certainly make the seasonal shedding very heavy.
  13. Lucy4

    Lucy4 New Member

    It's not surprising at all that the shifting hormone levels of women who have gone through menopause could influence hair growth and loss. I find it ironic that lower estrogen levels allow new hair growth in places we would rather not have it. ;) I had good results using Estroven after I stopped the prescription HRT a few years ago. Since I'm not a good candidate for HRT at this time, I'm considering trying the herbal route again next spring when I expect the next round of hair loss to be on the horizon.
  14. newbs

    newbs New Member

    Lucy- When you say you had good results with Estroven, do you mean as far as hair loss? Do you know what your estrogen level was when you started Estrogven? Do you know what it is now? I am seriously considering natural HRT for my low estogen, but the doctor said it is testosterone that will help my hair, skin etc. I doubt she knows much about how testosterone can cause hair loss in those suceptible and I will have to tell her I want NO testosterone in my HRT. I hope I don't step on her toes by telling her that, but I sure don't want to risk any extra androgen.
  15. Lucy4

    Lucy4 New Member

    Hope this answers your questions.
    ~L